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Nine Myths About Disposable Safety Gloves

Nine Myths About Disposable Safety Gloves

CTI February 22, 2015 0 comments
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A good read from ohsonline.com Disposable nitrile, natural latex, and vinyl gloves, often referred to as thin-mil gloves, are used in a variety of distinct applications. Understanding the truths about glove performance is important in selecting the right glove for each application. MYTH #1: MORE TEXTURE MEANS BETTER GRIP One of the most common misconceptions […]

A good read from ohsonline.com

Disposable nitrile, natural latex, and vinyl gloves, often referred to as thin-mil gloves, are used in a variety of distinct applications. Understanding the truths about glove performance is important in selecting the right glove for each application.

MYTH #1: MORE TEXTURE MEANS BETTER GRIP

One of the most common misconceptions about disposable gloves is that more texture results in better grip. In fact, texture has very little effect on grip. It is possible to make an extremely textured glove with low grip and a smooth-surfaced glove with high grip.

Surface treatment is the most significant factor in the grip level of a glove. Natural latex is inherently sticky, or tacky, much like glue. Without proper processing, natural latex sticks together like a large ball of adhesive. To reduce this tack, the surface must be treated. The most common surface treatments are surface chlorination and coating. Chlorination changes the surface properties and creates a hard, lower-tack shell around the glove. Coating technology adds a new, lower-tack layer to the glove.

Reality: Surface tack, or grip, can be controlled by the level of chlorination or the characteristics of the coating.

MYTH #2: GLOVES REMAIN SAFE THROUGHOUT USE

Throughout use, gloves can develop holes due to degradation and wear. According to one study, after only 12 minutes of simulated clinical use, natural latex and vinyl glove defect rates increased to 9 percent and 35 percent, respectively. Without proper curing and cross-linking, nitrile can swell and develop holes or defects over time. Failure is commonly observed in the crotch between the thumb and forefinger.

In addition to formulation and process, use factors, such as average wear time and application, affect the inuse defect rate. Buyers should consider the potential defect rate increase and the risk imposed. They should ask their glove suppliers for supporting studies on in-use testing. Buyers and users can perform a representative test themselves by wearing a pair of new, tight-fitting gloves for the prescribed use time and then removing and filling the gloves with water to see whether a hole developed.

Reality: Gloves degrade during use.

MYTH #3: GLOVES CAN BE ‘100%’ NITRILE, NATURAL LATEX, OR VINYL

Glove suppliers frequently claim glove composition of “100%” of the respective materials. Without additives, it is practically impossible to produce a usable glove of any of these materials. Adding curatives, cross-link agents, and accelerators to nitrile and natural latex is essential to making a strong, durable glove. Vinyl requires plasticizers and activation agents. Surfactants, which help with film formulation, are another additive found in most gloves. Formulations typically require 4-10 percent of additives to make a good glove.

Reality: Claims of “100%” nitrile, natural latex, or vinyl are not accurate.

 

Read the full original article online at ohsonline.com

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